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Saturday, July 30, 2016

What Makes People Feel Upbeat at Work - The New Yorker

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"There was, of course, a perfectly sound legal reason for this seemingly odd decision. The ruling was the culmination of a series of charges that had been brought against the company in the course of several years, during which the N.L.R.B. struck down multiple T-Mobile policies that appeared to hamper union organization and other, more benign efforts to discuss employment practices. The wording in the employee manual regarding the ‘positive work environment,’ the board held, was ‘ambiguous and vague’ enough to have a chilling effect on the right of employees to speak freely and to organize, rights guaranteed under the National Labor Relations Act. Because the ‘positive work environment’ was never explicitly described, workers would have to err on the side of over-sensitivity—steering clear of ‘potentially controversial but protected communication in the workplace,’ as the ruling put it—lest they be punished."

(Via.)  What Makes People Feel Upbeat at Work - The New Yorker:

Hillary Clinton sees post-convention boost over Trump, but will it last? | US news | The Guardian

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" A poll released on Saturday has given Hillary Clinton a 15-point lead over Donald Trump, suggesting the Democratic nominee for president is enjoying a significant post-convention boost."

(Via.)  Hillary Clinton sees post-convention boost over Trump, but will it last? | US news | The Guardian:

Donald Trump and Russia: a web that grows more tangled all the time | US news | The Guardian

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"A key figure at the Republican national convention where Donald Trump was nominated for president has strong business ties with Ukraine, the Guardian has learned..

The coordinator of the Washington diplomatic corps for the Republicans in Cleveland was Frank Mermoud, a former state department official involved in business ventures in Ukraine via Cub Energy, a Black Sea-focused oil and gas company of which he is a director. He is also on the board of the US Ukraine Business Council.

Mermoud has longstanding ties to Trump’s campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, who in 2010 helped pro-Russia Viktor Yanukovych refashion his image and win a presidential election in Ukraine. Manafort was brought in earlier this year to oversee the convention operations and its staffing.

Three sources at the convention also told the Guardian that they saw Philip Griffin, a long-time aide to Manafort in Kiev, working with the foreign dignitaries programme.

‘After years of working in the Ukraine for Paul and others, it was surprising to run into Phil working at the convention,’ one said.

The change to the platform on arming Ukraine was condemned even by some Republicans. Senator Rob Portman of Ohio described it as ‘deeply troubling’. Veteran party operative and lobbyist Charlie Black said the ‘new position in the platform doesn’t have much support from Republicans’, adding that the change ‘was unusual’.

(Via.)  Donald Trump and Russia: a web that grows more tangled all the time | US news | The Guardian:

Electoral Map Gives Donald Trump Few Places to Go - The New York Times

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"Even as Mr. Trump has ticked up in national polls in recent weeks, senior Republicans say his path to the 270 Electoral College votes needed for election has remained narrow — and may have grown even more precarious. It now looks exceedingly difficult for him to assemble even the barest Electoral College majority without beating Hillary Clinton in a trifecta of the biggest swing states: Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania.
 President Obama won all three states in 2008 and 2012, and no Republican has won Pennsylvania in nearly three decades.

Electoral Map Gives Donald Trump Few Places to Go - The New York Times: ""

Friday, July 29, 2016

NYC DOT studying bringing Staten Island Ferry to Midtown - NY Daily News

 

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"Staten Island’s seafaring commuters may get to sail to Midtown one day.

The city Department of Transportation is studying the possibility of bringing the Staten Island Ferry to E. 34th St. in Manhattan, as well as Pier 11 near Wall St., according to a letter the agency sent to Staten Island Borough President James Oddo.

“This could be an exciting opportunity,” Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg wrote to Oddo in the July 28 letter. “But I agree with you that there are many hurdles that need to be analyzed including the need for additional new ferries and significant upgrades to the current terminal infrastructure.”

Oddo in April requested in a letter to DOT that the agency into his suggestions to drop off passengers at ferry terminals on E. 34th St. and Wall St."

 

NYC DOT studying bringing Staten Island Ferry to Midtown - NY Daily News: "

Courts Crush Voter Suppression Just in Time for Election Day - An appeals court struck down North Carolina’s law for being designed to discriminate against blacks. It’s the third victory in a row for voting rights and sets up more wins before Nov. 8.- The Daily Beast

 

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Courts Crush Voter Suppression Just in Time for Election Day - The Daily Beast: ""

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Follow Trump’s Money to Moscow

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The phrase “follow the money” is supposed to help explain human behavior, especially in politics. So why has Donald Trump embraced Russian President Vladimir Putin? Why has he denied the evidence of Putin’s killing of Russian journalists and dissidents? A savvy businessman, Trump is certainly not dumb. There must be something else to it.
Reports dating back to 1987, during the time of the old Soviet Union, reveal that Trump has been seeking business in Russia and attempting to build a “Russian Trump Tower” in Moscow and perhaps other Russian cities.


At this particular time in history, with Putin’s cronies under financial sanctions because of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Putin’s praise for Trump may signal another attempt to get the capitalists and their money back into Russia. Such a ploy depends on Trump and others rehabilitating Putin by claiming that he is fighting terrorism in Syria, not bolstering a long-time Soviet/Russian client state. Thanks to the effectiveness of the Russia Today (RT) channel, which saturates the U.S. media market, especially cable television, Putin is indeed looking like a statesman on the world stage.


Trump’s relationship with Russia goes far back. In 1987, before the collapse of the Soviet Union, he was meeting with Soviet officials and negotiating the building of “luxury hotels” in Moscow and Leningrad. A story at the time said Trump had met Soviet Ambassador Yuri Dubinin, who mentioned how much his daughter had admired the “opulent” Trump Tower in New York City. This led to an invitation to Trump to visit the USSR. The story said Dubinin wrote a letter to Trump, who hosted a meeting with Soviet officials in New York.

Follow Trump’s Money to Moscow: ""

Monday, July 25, 2016

Dozens Reported Dead, Injured in Knife Attack Outside Tokyo - The Atlantic





"A knife attack outside Tokyo has left at least 15 people dead and 45 more wounded, according to Japanese media.



The attack occurred at a facility for disabled individuals in the city of Sagamihara, located about 30 kilometers, or 20 miles, southwest of the Japanese capital, reported NHK, Japan’s national broadcaster.



The knife-wielding attacker, a man in his 20s and a former employee at the facility, entered the building at about 2:30 a.m. local time, according to NHK. He turned himself into police about half an hour later.



Sagamihara, located in the Kanazawa prefecture, is home to about 719,000 people, and is the fifth most populous suburb in greater Tokyo.



It is early morning on Tuesday in Japan. This is a developing story, and we’ll update as we learn more."



Dozens Reported Dead, Injured in Knife Attack Outside Tokyo - The Atlantic