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Saturday, June 04, 2016

The Benghazi Committee’s Dead End - The New York Times

 

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"If things had gone his way, Mr. Gowdy, a former federal prosecutor, would have found a way to torpedo Mrs. Clinton’s presidential ambitions. After all, Republican lawmakers have admitted that this is precisely what they set out to do.

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(Via.)  The Benghazi Committee’s Dead End - The New York Times:

Wednesday, June 01, 2016

Hillary Clinton to Portray Donald Trump’s Foreign Policy Positions as Dangerous - The New York Times

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"Mrs. Clinton’s campaign aides said the speech, which she will deliver in San Diego, would be the start of a persistent assault to portray a potential Trump presidency as a dangerous proposition that would weaken American alliances and embolden enemies.
The argument will include specific criticism of comments Mr. Trump has made about rethinking the United States’s support of NATO; his proposal to allow Japan, South Korea and Saudi Arabia to acquire nuclear weapons; his vow to temporarily bar Muslims from entering the United States; and his pledge to advance the use of torture and kill the families of suspected terrorists.Hillary

(Via.)  Clinton to Portray Donald Trump’s Foreign Policy Positions as Dangerous - The New York Times: ""

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Bernie Sanders agrees: Democratic process not 'rigged' | MSNBC

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‘Rigged’ implies some kind of nefarious scheme, tilting the playing field to ensure a predetermined outcome. In this sense, there’s nothing ‘rigged’ about the race for the Democratic nomination: both Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were aware of the lay of the land in advance; both understood what it would take to succeed; both created game plans based on the existing rules, and both recognized that those rules, some of which were established years in advance, would remain unaltered once the process began in earnest.   In other words, as Sanders himself now acknowledges, the fix wasn’t in. The Sanders and Clinton campaigns played by the agreed upon rules, and one campaign appears to have come out on top by earning more pledged delegates, superdelegates, votes, and contests.   It’s precisely what made the senator’s comments on Sunday so noteworthy: Sanders doesn’t see a conspiracy or nefarious scheme, but he does see a ‘dumb’ nominating process in need of reform. Is he right? Maybe! In Democratic politics, I suspect there are very few people who would look at the existing system and say it’s 100% flawless and any proposed changes must be rejected out of hand."

(Via.)  Bernie Sanders agrees: Democratic process not 'rigged' | MSNBC:

Countdown: here’s how Hillary Clinton clinches the democratic nomination over the next week By Bill Palmer | May 30, 2016"

 "The total delegate count is still not quite in agreement. For instance CNN and the Associated Press both agree that Hillary needs another 73 delegates in order to mathematically clinch the nomination, whereas other news outlets have slightly different totals; our own in-house estimate is 69 delegates. But the number doesn’t have to be exact for these purposes, because the math of the next eight days will be rather straightforward.

Clinton will pick up three to five more delegates in the Virgin Islands on June 4th. Then she’ll pick up perhaps 30 to 35 delegates in Puerto Rico on June 5th. That will put her in a position of needing approximately 40 more delegates heading into June 7th, a day when several states will vote. The first to close its polls will be New Jersey. Hillary will need to win no more than around one-third of its delegates to pick up what she needs in order to mathematically clinch the nomination."

 

(Via.)   "Countdown: here’s how Hillary Clinton clinches the democratic nomination over the next week By Bill Palmer | May 30, 2016"

Countdown: here’s how Hillary Clinton clinches the democratic nomination over the next week By Bill Palmer | May 30, 2016

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"The total delegate count is still not quite in agreement. For instance CNN and the Associated Press both agree that Hillary needs another 73 delegates in order to mathematically clinch the nomination, whereas other news outlets have slightly different totals; our own in-house estimate is 69 delegates. But the number doesn’t have to be exact for these purposes, because the math of the next eight days will be rather straightforward.

Clinton will pick up three to five more delegates in the Virgin Islands on June 4th. Then she’ll pick up perhaps 30 to 35 delegates in Puerto Rico on June 5th. That will put her in a position of needing approximately 40 more delegates heading into June 7th, a day when several states will vote. The first to close its polls will be New Jersey. Hillary will need to win no more than around one-third of its delegates to pick up what she needs in order to mathematically clinch the nomination."

(Via.)

Donald Trump Soured on a Deal, and Hong Kong Partners Became Litigants - The New York Times

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“I beat China all the time,” Mr. Trump declared in a speech the day he announced his candidacy. “I own a big chunk of the Bank of America building at 1290 Avenue of the Americas that I got from China in a war. Very valuable.”


Mr. Trump does have an investment in the building, an office tower near Rockefeller Center. But court documents and interviews with people involved in the deal tell a very different story of how he ended up with it.It began when a group of Hong Kong billionaires, including one who has been called the Donald Trump of China, helped rescue Mr. Trump from the verge of bankruptcy by investing in one of his properties in Manhattan.
For years, the carefully cultivated relationship between Mr. Trump and his Hong Kong partners proved lucrative for both sides, and stands out as perhaps the closest that Mr. Trump has come to international diplomacy.


To strike the deal, Mr. Trump had to attend elaborate dinner parties featuring foreign foods he did not want to eat. He delayed the closing because of Chinese spiritual beliefs and hunted around New York for a “feng shui” master to help with the building d├ęcor, instead of indulging his tastes for marble and gold, according to former associates of Mr. Trump who were involved in the deal.
But when his Hong Kong partners sold the property without his support, Mr. Trump waged a bitter, long-shot legal battle against them. And far from winning his share of the Bank of America building, according to court documents, he had to settle for it after losing in court.

(Via.)  Donald Trump Soured on a Deal, and Hong Kong Partners Became Litigants - The New York Times: ""

Monday, May 30, 2016

Eric Holder, who really wanted to put Edward Snowden in jail, now says he performed a 'public service' | The Verge

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"Edward Snowden performed a 'public service' by prompting changes to the US government's mass surveillance programs, says former US Attorney General Eric Holder.

Holder still thinks that Snowden's decision to leak classified documents was 'inappropriate and illegal,' but — now one year out of office — Holder's view of Snowden seems to have shifted in a substantial way. 'We can certainly argue about the way in which Snowden did what he did, but I think that he actually performed a public service by raising the debate that we engaged in and by the changes that we made,' Holder said on the CNN-produced podcast The Axe Files.

The argument that what Snowden did is both inappropriate and a public service is a bit hard to reconcile, but it's a big leap for Holder, who as attorney general maintained that Snowden would have to plead guilty if he so much as wanted to talk with US authorities."

(Via.)  Eric Holder, who really wanted to put Edward Snowden in jail, now says he performed a 'public service' | The Verge:

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Why the 'Roots' Remake Is So Important - The Atlantic

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“To date, America’s most defining chapter, slavery—with all of its complexity, contradictions, and endless fictional and true narrative possibilities—has been under-treated by Hollywood. The recent visibility of films such as the Oscar-winning 12 Years a Slave, Nate Parker’s record-breaking Birth of a Nation, the intriguing, savvy WGN series Underground, and Django Unchained, Tarantino’s fantastical slave era-cowboy hero flick—might make it appear otherwise. (BET’s unusual but laudable 2015 effort, The Book of Negroes miniseries, failed to widely engage American viewers.)

A&E’s Roots confronts this distorted but popular belief that the subject of slavery has not only been covered, but done well, done enough, or even done too much. There continues to be a deep-seated American cultural discomfort with slavery, and neither the financial success of Birth of a Nation at Sundance nor the critical success of Twelve Years a Slave and Underground has yet led to a sustained national discussion and interrogation of this discomfort.  "

(Via.)  Why the 'Roots' Remake Is So Important - The Atlantic:

Real Time with Bill Maher: Overtime. Trump Will Win In A Landslide? This is getting scary. – May 27, 2016 (HBO)

Chicago’s Murder Problem - The New York Times

"There was a time when it looked as if Chicago would follow New York and Los Angeles into a kind of sustained peace. Then progress stalled in 2004, and the city has been through some harrowing years leading up to another alarming spike in homicides this year.

Homicide Rate 30 per 100,000 Chicago Rate has held steady since 2004. Rate rose from 2014 to 2015 and is on an upward trajectory this year. 25 20 Los Angeles 15 10 New York City 5 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 Already embroiled in a crisis over race and police conduct, Chicago now faces a 62 percent increase in homicides. Through mid-May, 216 people have been killed. Shootings also are up 60 percent.

So what’s going on in Chicago?

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 It’s complicated, but a comparison with New York is a good place to start. Both cities began the 1990s with historically high homicide rates; both have diverse populations, including large numbers of blacks, Hispanics and whites, and a wide range of economic fortune as well.

Chicago has about the same population as Brooklyn, but a year’s worth of homicides in the two places shows an astonishing difference in the toll.

400 Chicago Longest stretch without homicide: 5 days Cumulative Homicides in 2015 New York City 300 200 Brooklyn Longest stretch without homicide: 22 days 100 APRIL JAN. FEB. MARCH JULY DEC. NOV. OCT. SEPT. JUNE MAY AUG. "

 

 

 

(Via.)  Chicago’s Murder Problem - The New York Times: