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Thursday, August 25, 2016

Is Donald Trump a Racist? - The New York Times

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"HAS the party of Lincoln just nominated a racist to be president? We shouldn’t toss around such accusations lightly, so I’ve looked back over more than 40 years of Donald Trump’s career to see what the record says.
One early red flag arose in 1973, when President Richard Nixon’s Justice Department — not exactly the radicals of the day — sued Trump and his father, Fred Trump, for systematically discriminating against blacks in housing rentals.
I’ve waded through 1,021 pages of documents from that legal battle, and they are devastating. Donald Trump was then president of the family real estate firm, and the government amassed overwhelming evidence that the company had a policy of discriminating against blacks, including those serving in the military.
To prove the discrimination, blacks were repeatedly dispatched as testers to Trump apartment buildings to inquire about vacancies, and white testers were sent soon after. Repeatedly, the black person was told that nothing was available, while the white tester was shown apartments for immediate rental.
A former building superintendent working for the Trumps explained that he was told to code any application by a black person with the letter C, for colored, apparently so the office would know to reject it. A Trump rental agent said the Trumps wanted to rent only to “Jews and executives,” and discouraged renting to blacks.
Donald Trump furiously fought the civil rights suit in the courts and the media, but the Trumps eventually settled on terms that were widely regarded as a victory for the government. Three years later, the government sued the Trumps again, for continuing to discriminate.
In fairness, those suits date from long ago, and the discriminatory policies were probably put in place not by Donald Trump but by his father. Fred Trump appears to have been arrested at a Ku Klux Klan rally in 1927; Woody Guthrie, who lived in a Trump property in the 1950s, lambasted Fred Trump in recently discovered papers for stirring racial hatred.
Yet even if Donald Trump inherited his firm’s discriminatory policies, he allied himself decisively in the 1970s housing battle against the civil rights movement.
Another revealing moment came in 1989, when New York City was convulsed by the “Central Park jogger” case, a rape and beating of a young white woman. Five black and Latino teenagers were arrested.
Trump stepped in, denounced Mayor Ed Koch’s call for peace and bought full-page newspaper ads calling for the death penalty. The five teenagers spent years in prison before being exonerated. In retrospect, they suffered a modern version of a lynching, and Trump played a part in whipping up the crowds.
As Trump moved into casinos, discrimination followed. In the 1980s, according to a former Trump casino worker, Kip Brown, who was quoted by The New Yorker: “When Donald and Ivana came to the casino, the bosses would order all the black people off the floor. … They put us all in the back.”
In 1991, a book by John O’Donnell, who had been president of the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, quoted Trump as criticizing a black accountant and saying: “Black guys counting my money! I hate it. The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day. … I think that the guy is lazy. And it’s probably not his fault, because laziness is a trait in blacks. It really is, I believe that. It’s not anything they can control.” O’Donnell wrote that for months afterward, Trump pressed him to fire the black accountant, until the man resigned of his own accord.
Trump eventually denied making those comments. But in 1997 in a Playboy interview, he conceded “the stuff O’Donnell wrote about me is probably true.”

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Boko Haram Leader Is Wounded in Airstrike, Nigeria's Military Says

"DAKAR, Senegal — The Nigerian military said on Tuesday that airstrikes had killed and wounded several top Boko Haram commanders in the Sambisa Forest in the country’s northeast, where militants have been hiding for months.

Among the wounded was Abubakar Shekau, who took the helm of the group after the death of its founder in 2009, according to Col. Sani Usman, a military spokesman. The military’s attack took place on Friday.

At least three other top commanders were killed in “the most unprecedented and spectacular air raid,” the military said in a news release."

Friday, August 12, 2016

Harassment Crisis Builds at Fox News, Despite Its Swift Response - The New York Times

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"When the anchor Gretchen Carlson filed a bombshell lawsuit accusing the Fox News chairman Roger Ailes of sexual harassment, Fox’s corporate masters moved fast.

 

A major law firm was hired to investigate. Two weeks later, Mr. Ailes was gone, ousted from the network he ran for two decades. Rupert Murdoch stepped in as chairman, sending a clear message: This is a fresh start.

 

But the grim tales about life under Mr. Ailes keep coming. More women have come forward — the latest was a former daytime host, Andrea Tantaros — describing a culture of intimidation and misogyny, and telling of settlements they received to leave the network. Some of Mr. Ailes’s top deputies who remain in charge at Fox News have been accused of aiding his behavior. Inside the newsroom, employees are still on edge about what new stories might surface and which executives could be ensnared.

 

If the Murdoch family wanted to leap ahead of this scandal, it is now at risk of falling behind. Some people at Fox News are asking if meaningful change can occur inside a workplace still stocked with loyalists to Mr. Ailes. “People are waiting to see,” one staff member said."

Harassment Crisis Builds at Fox News, Despite Its Swift Response - The New York Times: ""

Harassment Crisis Builds at Fox News, Despite Its Swift Response - The New York Times

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"When the anchor Gretchen Carlson filed a bombshell lawsuit accusing the Fox News chairman Roger Ailes of sexual harassment, Fox’s corporate masters moved fast.
A major law firm was hired to investigate. Two weeks later, Mr. Ailes was gone, ousted from the network he ran for two decades. Rupert Murdoch stepped in as chairman, sending a clear message: This is a fresh start.But the grim tales about life under Mr. Ailes keep coming. More women have come forward — the latest was a former daytime host, Andrea Tantaros — describing a culture of intimidation and misogyny, and telling of settlements they received to leave the network. Some of Mr. Ailes’s top deputies who remain in charge at Fox News have been accused of aiding his behavior. Inside the newsroom, employees are still on edge about what new stories might surface and which executives could be ensnared.If the Murdoch family wanted to leap ahead of this scandal, it is now at risk of falling behind. Some people at Fox News are asking if meaningful change can occur inside a workplace still stocked with loyalists to Mr. Ailes. “People are waiting to see,” one staff member said."Harassment Crisis Builds at Fox News, Despite Its Swift Response - The New York Times: “

 

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Man climbs on trump tower in New York

Donald Trump’s Tax-Return Dodge - The New Yorker

If Donald Trump continues to stonewall on releasing his tax returns, it’s clear that he’s doing so because it’s his choice, not his legal obligation.





"The law is clear about publicly releasing tax returns. The I.R.S. is prohibited from doing so, but taxpayers themselves have every right to disclose their own returns. Does the existence of an audit change the legal status of public disclosure? The answer is no; Trump can release the returns if he wants to. “He filed these tax returns under penalty of perjury with the I.R.S.,” Scott Michel, a partner at Caplin & Drysdale, a leading tax-law firm, said. “If he were to disclose the returns publicly, he’s not disclosing anything that the I.R.S. doesn’t already know about. A disclosure in and of itself cannot possibly prejudice or hurt him with his audit.”



Donald Trump’s Tax-Return Dodge - The New Yorker

From Trump’s controversial words, a pattern: Outrage, headlines and then denial - The Washington Post

"From Trump’s controversial words, a pattern: Outrage, headlines and then denial"

From Trump’s controversial words, a pattern: Outrage, headlines and then denial - The Washington Post: ""

Further Into the Muck With Mr. Trump - The New York Times

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"...Seldom, if ever, have Americans been exposed to a candidate so willing to descend to the depths of bigotry and intolerance as Mr. Trump. That he would make Tuesday’s comment amid sinking poll numbers and a wave of Republican defections suggests that when bathed in the adulation of a crowd, Mr. Trump is unable to control himself.
Just eight years ago, Senator John McCain of Arizona, then the Republican presidential nominee, told a man at a town hall session who said he was “scared” of an Obama presidency that Mr. Obama “is a decent person and a person that you do not have to be scared as president of the United States.”
Twenty minutes later, a woman told Mr. McCain that she couldn’t trust Mr. Obama because “he’s an Arab.” “No ma’am,” Mr. McCain replied. “He’s a decent family man, a citizen, that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues. And that’s what this campaign is all about.”
Republicans would do well to summon the integrity that Mr. McCain showed in 2008, and not just to give some sense of decency to this ugly campaign. The time has come for Republicans — including Mr. McCain — to repudiate Mr. Trump once and for all."

Further Into the Muck With Mr. Trump - The New York Times: ""