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Monday, August 05, 2013

Qaeda Leader’s Edict to Yemen Affiliate Is Said to Prompt Alert - NYTimes.com

Qaeda Leader’s Edict to Yemen Affiliate Is Said to Prompt Alert - NYTimes.com

The intercepted conversations last week between Ayman al-Zawahri, who succeeded Osama bin Laden as the head of the global terrorist group, and Nasser al-Wuhayshi, the head of the Yemen-based Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, revealed one of the most serious plots against American and other Western interests since the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, American intelligence officials and lawmakers have said.

It is highly unusual for senior Qaeda leaders in Pakistan to discuss operational matters with the group’s affiliates, so when the intercepts between the two senior Qaeda leaders were collected and analyzed last week, senior officials at the C.I.A., the State Department and the White House immediately seized on their significance. Members of Congress were quickly provided classified briefings on the matter, American officials said.

Tawana Brawley starts paying man she falsely accused of rape in 1987 - CNN.com

(CNN) -- After 26 years, Tawana Brawley has finally begun paying damages to Steven Pagones, a man she falsely accused of being among a group of men who raped her in 1987.
Brawley's payment comes in the form of nearly $3,800 in wage garnishments, Pagones told CNN Sunday. Brawley still owes Pagones more than $400,000 in defamation damages.
In fall 1987, Brawley, who is African-American, was found disheveled inside a trash bag with racial slurs written across her body in Wappingers Falls, New York. Brawley, then 15, claimed she was kidnapped and repeatedly raped by a group of white men.
In one of his first mainstream cases, activist Al Sharpton became Brawley's spokesman, staging rallies and calling for justice on her behalf.

Tawana Brawley starts paying man she falsely accused of rape in 1987 - CNN.com

DEA Special Operations Division Covers Up Surveillance Used To Investigate Americans: Report

WASHINGTON, Aug 5 (Reuters) - A secretive U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration unit is funneling information from intelligence intercepts, wiretaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records to authorities across the nation to help them launch criminal investigations of Americans.