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Thursday, November 16, 2006

BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Bush vows strong support for Asia

BBC NEWS | Asia-Pacific | Bush vows strong support for Asia

Bush vows strong support for Asia
President George W Bush has vowed to maintain strong US engagement in Asia in a key speech on his first overseas trip since heavy mid-term poll losses.

Speaking in Singapore, Mr Bush said the US would resist "old temptations of isolationism and protectionism".

Despite opposition in the Democrat-held Congress, he defended open markets, saying an Asia-Pacific free trade area must be "seriously considered".

He also urged North Korea to seek "a peaceful path" in the nuclear crisis.

'Common opportunities'

A large part of Mr Bush's speech on Thursday at the National University of Singapore was devoted to the opportunities afforded by global free trade.


America believes in free and fair trade and we will continue to open up new avenues to commerce and investment across this region
George W Bush

"We hear voices calling for us to retreat from the world and close our doors to these opportunities," he said.

"These are the old temptations of isolationism and protectionism and America must reject them. We must maintain our presence in the Pacific. We must seize on our common opportunities."

Mr Bush vowed that the US would "remain engaged in Asia because our interests depend on the expansion of freedom and opportunity in this region".

Ahead of his three-nation Asian tour, Mr Bush had suffered a setback when an historic bill to normalise trade with communist Vietnam failed in the House of Representatives.

The BBC's Jonathan Head in Singapore says Mr Bush's Asian hosts are aware that in the last two years of his presidency, his hands may be tied by a Democrat-controlled Congress with more protectionist instincts.

Nevertheless, Mr Bush defended his trade beliefs.

He said: "Recently some [Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation] members have advanced the idea of a free trade agreement for the entire Apec region. I believe this idea deserves serious consideration."

Mr Bush's tour will take in this weekend's 21-nation Apec summit in Vietnam. He will also visit Indonesia and next week travel to Europe for a Nato summit.

On North Korea, Mr Bush called on Pyongyang to take "concrete steps" to help resume high-level talks aimed at curbing its nuclear programme.

He urged regional countries to make it clear that any North Korean proliferation of nuclear technology to terrorists or hostile regimes "would not be tolerated".

Mr Bush also called for co-operation in finding new affordable and reliable supplies of energy. "It is in the world's interest to work together to end our addiction to oil," he said.

Hanoi meetings

After Mr Bush arrived in Singapore on Thursday, he and the First Lady visited Singapore's Asian Civilisations Museum and were treated to traditional Javanese and Singaporean music.

Mr Bush briefly tried to play a saron - an Asian-style xylophone - but said: "I'm going to quit while I'm ahead."

The president is likely to hold a number of meetings on the sidelines of the Apec summit in Hanoi at the weekend.

He will meet Japan's new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun, Russian leader Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Hu Jintao.

Story from BBC NEWS:

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

O.J. Simpson to Discuss Killings - New York Times

O.J. Simpson to Discuss Killings - New York Times
November 15, 2006

O.J. Simpson to Discuss Killings

Filed at 12:09 p.m. ET

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Fox plans to broadcast an interview with O.J. Simpson in which the former football star discusses ''how he would have committed'' the slayings of his ex-wife and her friend, for which he was acquitted, the network said.

The two-part interview, titled ''O.J. Simpson: If I Did It, Here's How It Happened,'' will air Nov. 27 and Nov. 29, the TV network said.

Simpson has agreed to an ''unrestricted'' interview with book publisher Judith Regan, Fox said.

''O.J. Simpson, in his own words, tells for the first time how he would have committed the murders if he were the one responsible for the crimes,'' the network said in a statement. ''In the two-part event, Simpson describes how he would have carried out the murders he has vehemently denied committing for over a decade.''

The interview will air days before Simpson's new book, ''If I Did It,'' goes on sale Nov. 30. The book, published by Regan, ''hypothetically describes how the murders would have been committed.''

In a video clip on the network's Web site, an off-screen interviewer says to Simpson, ''You wrote 'I have never seen so much blood in my life.'''

''I don't think any two people could be murdered without everybody being covered in blood,'' Simpson responds.

Simpson, who now lives in Florida, was acquitted in a criminal trial of the 1994 killings of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman. Simpson was later found liable in 1997 in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the Goldman family.

Messages left with Simpson and his attorney Yale Galanter were not immediately returned.

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com

U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com: U.S. report: Racial disparities continue
Differences in income, education, home ownership continue, data finds
The Associated Press
Updated: 12:01 a.m. ET Nov 14, 2006

WASHINGTON - Decades after the civil rights movement, racial disparities in income, education and home ownership persist and, by some measurements, are growing.

White households had incomes that were two-thirds higher than blacks and 40 percent higher than Hispanics last year, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

White adults were also more likely than black and Hispanic adults to have college degrees and to own their own homes. They were less likely to live in poverty.

“Race is so associated with class in the United States that it may not be direct discrimination, but it still matters indirectly,” said Dalton Conley, a sociology professor at New York University and the author of “Being Black, Living in the Red.”

“It doesn’t mean it’s any less powerful just because it’s indirect,” he said.

Home ownership grew among white middle-class families after World War II when access to credit and government programs made buying houses affordable. Black families were largely left out because of discrimination, and the effects are still being felt today, said Lance Freeman, assistant professor of urban planning at Columbia University and author of “There Goes the ’Hood.”

Home ownership is key
Home ownership creates wealth, which enables families to live in good neighborhoods with good schools. It also helps families finance college, which leads to better-paying jobs, perpetuating the cycle, Freeman said.

“If your parents own their own home they can leave it to you when they pass on or they can use the equity to help you with a down payment on yours,” Freeman said.

Three-fourths of white households owned their homes in 2005, compared with 46 percent of black households and 48 percent of Latino households. Home ownership is near an all-time high in the United States, but racial gaps have increased in the past 25 years.

Black families have also been hurt by the decline of manufacturing jobs — the same jobs that helped propel many white families into the middle class after World War II, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP’s Washington office.

Among Hispanics, education, income and home ownership gaps are exacerbated by recent Latin American immigrants. Hispanic immigrants have, on average, lower incomes and education levels than people born in the United States. About 40 percent of U.S. Hispanics are immigrants.

Asian Americans, on average, have higher incomes and education levels than whites. However, they have higher poverty rates and lower home ownership rates.

The Census Bureau released 2005 racial data on incomes, education levels, home ownership rates and poverty rates Tuesday. The data are from the American Community Survey, the bureau’s new annual survey of 3 million households nationwide. The Associated Press compared the figures with census data from 1980, 1990 and 2000.

Among the findings:

  • Black adults have narrowed the gap with white adults in earning high school diplomas, but the gap has widened for college degrees. Thirty percent of white adults had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005, while 17 percent of black adults and 12 percent of Hispanic adults had degrees.
  • Forty-nine percent of Asian Americans had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005.
  • The median income for white households was $50,622 last year. It was $30,939 for black households, $36,278 for Hispanic households and $60,367 for Asian households.
  • Median income for black households has stayed about 60 percent of the income for white households since 1980. In dollar terms, the gap has grown from $18,123 to $19,683.
  • Hispanic households made about 76 percent as much as white households in 1980. In 2005, it was 72 percent.
  • The gap in poverty rates has narrowed since 1980, but it remains substantial. The poverty rate for white residents was 8.3 percent on 2005. It was 24.9 percent for black residents, 21.8 percent for Hispanic residents and 11.1 percent for Asian residents.
  • Thomas Shapiro, professor of law and social policy at Brandeis University, said the “easiest answer” to narrowing racial gaps is to promote home ownership, which would help minority families accumulate wealth.

    “The wealth gap is not just a story of merit and achievement, it’s also a story of the historical legacy of race in the United Sates,” said Shapiro, author of “The Hidden Cost of Being African American.”

    Shelton, of the NAACP, called for more funding for preschool programs such as Head Start, improving public schools and making college more affordable.

    “Income should not be a significant determining factor whether someone should have an opportunity to go to college,” Shelton said.


    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com

    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com: U.S. report: Racial disparities continue
    Differences in income, education, home ownership continue, data finds
    The Associated Press
    Updated: 12:01 a.m. ET Nov 14, 2006

    WASHINGTON - Decades after the civil rights movement, racial disparities in income, education and home ownership persist and, by some measurements, are growing.

    White households had incomes that were two-thirds higher than blacks and 40 percent higher than Hispanics last year, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

    White adults were also more likely than black and Hispanic adults to have college degrees and to own their own homes. They were less likely to live in poverty.

    “Race is so associated with class in the United States that it may not be direct discrimination, but it still matters indirectly,” said Dalton Conley, a sociology professor at New York University and the author of “Being Black, Living in the Red.”

    “It doesn’t mean it’s any less powerful just because it’s indirect,” he said.

    Home ownership grew among white middle-class families after World War II when access to credit and government programs made buying houses affordable. Black families were largely left out because of discrimination, and the effects are still being felt today, said Lance Freeman, assistant professor of urban planning at Columbia University and author of “There Goes the ’Hood.”

    Home ownership is key
    Home ownership creates wealth, which enables families to live in good neighborhoods with good schools. It also helps families finance college, which leads to better-paying jobs, perpetuating the cycle, Freeman said.

    “If your parents own their own home they can leave it to you when they pass on or they can use the equity to help you with a down payment on yours,” Freeman said.

    Three-fourths of white households owned their homes in 2005, compared with 46 percent of black households and 48 percent of Latino households. Home ownership is near an all-time high in the United States, but racial gaps have increased in the past 25 years.

    Black families have also been hurt by the decline of manufacturing jobs — the same jobs that helped propel many white families into the middle class after World War II, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP’s Washington office.

    Among Hispanics, education, income and home ownership gaps are exacerbated by recent Latin American immigrants. Hispanic immigrants have, on average, lower incomes and education levels than people born in the United States. About 40 percent of U.S. Hispanics are immigrants.

    Asian Americans, on average, have higher incomes and education levels than whites. However, they have higher poverty rates and lower home ownership rates.

    The Census Bureau released 2005 racial data on incomes, education levels, home ownership rates and poverty rates Tuesday. The data are from the American Community Survey, the bureau’s new annual survey of 3 million households nationwide. The Associated Press compared the figures with census data from 1980, 1990 and 2000.

    Among the findings:

  • Black adults have narrowed the gap with white adults in earning high school diplomas, but the gap has widened for college degrees. Thirty percent of white adults had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005, while 17 percent of black adults and 12 percent of Hispanic adults had degrees.
  • Forty-nine percent of Asian Americans had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005.
  • The median income for white households was $50,622 last year. It was $30,939 for black households, $36,278 for Hispanic households and $60,367 for Asian households.
  • Median income for black households has stayed about 60 percent of the income for white households since 1980. In dollar terms, the gap has grown from $18,123 to $19,683.
  • Hispanic households made about 76 percent as much as white households in 1980. In 2005, it was 72 percent.
  • The gap in poverty rates has narrowed since 1980, but it remains substantial. The poverty rate for white residents was 8.3 percent on 2005. It was 24.9 percent for black residents, 21.8 percent for Hispanic residents and 11.1 percent for Asian residents.
  • Thomas Shapiro, professor of law and social policy at Brandeis University, said the “easiest answer” to narrowing racial gaps is to promote home ownership, which would help minority families accumulate wealth.

    “The wealth gap is not just a story of merit and achievement, it’s also a story of the historical legacy of race in the United Sates,” said Shapiro, author of “The Hidden Cost of Being African American.”

    Shelton, of the NAACP, called for more funding for preschool programs such as Head Start, improving public schools and making college more affordable.

    “Income should not be a significant determining factor whether someone should have an opportunity to go to college,” Shelton said.

    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com

    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com: U.S. report: Racial disparities continue
    Differences in income, education, home ownership continue, data finds
    The Associated Press
    Updated: 12:01 a.m. ET Nov 14, 2006

    WASHINGTON - Decades after the civil rights movement, racial disparities in income, education and home ownership persist and, by some measurements, are growing.

    White households had incomes that were two-thirds higher than blacks and 40 percent higher than Hispanics last year, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

    White adults were also more likely than black and Hispanic adults to have college degrees and to own their own homes. They were less likely to live in poverty.

    “Race is so associated with class in the United States that it may not be direct discrimination, but it still matters indirectly,” said Dalton Conley, a sociology professor at New York University and the author of “Being Black, Living in the Red.”

    “It doesn’t mean it’s any less powerful just because it’s indirect,” he said.

    Home ownership grew among white middle-class families after World War II when access to credit and government programs made buying houses affordable. Black families were largely left out because of discrimination, and the effects are still being felt today, said Lance Freeman, assistant professor of urban planning at Columbia University and author of “There Goes the ’Hood.”

    Home ownership is key
    Home ownership creates wealth, which enables families to live in good neighborhoods with good schools. It also helps families finance college, which leads to better-paying jobs, perpetuating the cycle, Freeman said.

    “If your parents own their own home they can leave it to you when they pass on or they can use the equity to help you with a down payment on yours,” Freeman said.

    Three-fourths of white households owned their homes in 2005, compared with 46 percent of black households and 48 percent of Latino households. Home ownership is near an all-time high in the United States, but racial gaps have increased in the past 25 years.

    Black families have also been hurt by the decline of manufacturing jobs — the same jobs that helped propel many white families into the middle class after World War II, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP’s Washington office.

    Among Hispanics, education, income and home ownership gaps are exacerbated by recent Latin American immigrants. Hispanic immigrants have, on average, lower incomes and education levels than people born in the United States. About 40 percent of U.S. Hispanics are immigrants.

    Asian Americans, on average, have higher incomes and education levels than whites. However, they have higher poverty rates and lower home ownership rates.

    The Census Bureau released 2005 racial data on incomes, education levels, home ownership rates and poverty rates Tuesday. The data are from the American Community Survey, the bureau’s new annual survey of 3 million households nationwide. The Associated Press compared the figures with census data from 1980, 1990 and 2000.

    Among the findings:

  • Black adults have narrowed the gap with white adults in earning high school diplomas, but the gap has widened for college degrees. Thirty percent of white adults had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005, while 17 percent of black adults and 12 percent of Hispanic adults had degrees.
  • Forty-nine percent of Asian Americans had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005.
  • The median income for white households was $50,622 last year. It was $30,939 for black households, $36,278 for Hispanic households and $60,367 for Asian households.
  • Median income for black households has stayed about 60 percent of the income for white households since 1980. In dollar terms, the gap has grown from $18,123 to $19,683.
  • Hispanic households made about 76 percent as much as white households in 1980. In 2005, it was 72 percent.
  • The gap in poverty rates has narrowed since 1980, but it remains substantial. The poverty rate for white residents was 8.3 percent on 2005. It was 24.9 percent for black residents, 21.8 percent for Hispanic residents and 11.1 percent for Asian residents.
  • Thomas Shapiro, professor of law and social policy at Brandeis University, said the “easiest answer” to narrowing racial gaps is to promote home ownership, which would help minority families accumulate wealth.

    “The wealth gap is not just a story of merit and achievement, it’s also a story of the historical legacy of race in the United Sates,” said Shapiro, author of “The Hidden Cost of Being African American.”

    Shelton, of the NAACP, called for more funding for preschool programs such as Head Start, improving public schools and making college more affordable.

    “Income should not be a significant determining factor whether someone should have an opportunity to go to college,” Shelton said.

    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com

    U.S. report: Racial disparities continue - Race in America - MSNBC.com: U.S. report: Racial disparities continue
    Differences in income, education, home ownership continue, data finds
    The Associated Press
    Updated: 12:01 a.m. ET Nov 14, 2006

    WASHINGTON - Decades after the civil rights movement, racial disparities in income, education and home ownership persist and, by some measurements, are growing.

    White households had incomes that were two-thirds higher than blacks and 40 percent higher than Hispanics last year, according to data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau.

    White adults were also more likely than black and Hispanic adults to have college degrees and to own their own homes. They were less likely to live in poverty.

    “Race is so associated with class in the United States that it may not be direct discrimination, but it still matters indirectly,” said Dalton Conley, a sociology professor at New York University and the author of “Being Black, Living in the Red.”

    “It doesn’t mean it’s any less powerful just because it’s indirect,” he said.

    Home ownership grew among white middle-class families after World War II when access to credit and government programs made buying houses affordable. Black families were largely left out because of discrimination, and the effects are still being felt today, said Lance Freeman, assistant professor of urban planning at Columbia University and author of “There Goes the ’Hood.”

    Home ownership is key
    Home ownership creates wealth, which enables families to live in good neighborhoods with good schools. It also helps families finance college, which leads to better-paying jobs, perpetuating the cycle, Freeman said.

    “If your parents own their own home they can leave it to you when they pass on or they can use the equity to help you with a down payment on yours,” Freeman said.

    Three-fourths of white households owned their homes in 2005, compared with 46 percent of black households and 48 percent of Latino households. Home ownership is near an all-time high in the United States, but racial gaps have increased in the past 25 years.

    Black families have also been hurt by the decline of manufacturing jobs — the same jobs that helped propel many white families into the middle class after World War II, said Hilary Shelton, director of the NAACP’s Washington office.

    Among Hispanics, education, income and home ownership gaps are exacerbated by recent Latin American immigrants. Hispanic immigrants have, on average, lower incomes and education levels than people born in the United States. About 40 percent of U.S. Hispanics are immigrants.

    Asian Americans, on average, have higher incomes and education levels than whites. However, they have higher poverty rates and lower home ownership rates.

    The Census Bureau released 2005 racial data on incomes, education levels, home ownership rates and poverty rates Tuesday. The data are from the American Community Survey, the bureau’s new annual survey of 3 million households nationwide. The Associated Press compared the figures with census data from 1980, 1990 and 2000.

    Among the findings:

  • Black adults have narrowed the gap with white adults in earning high school diplomas, but the gap has widened for college degrees. Thirty percent of white adults had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005, while 17 percent of black adults and 12 percent of Hispanic adults had degrees.
  • Forty-nine percent of Asian Americans had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2005.
  • The median income for white households was $50,622 last year. It was $30,939 for black households, $36,278 for Hispanic households and $60,367 for Asian households.
  • Median income for black households has stayed about 60 percent of the income for white households since 1980. In dollar terms, the gap has grown from $18,123 to $19,683.
  • Hispanic households made about 76 percent as much as white households in 1980. In 2005, it was 72 percent.
  • The gap in poverty rates has narrowed since 1980, but it remains substantial. The poverty rate for white residents was 8.3 percent on 2005. It was 24.9 percent for black residents, 21.8 percent for Hispanic residents and 11.1 percent for Asian residents.
  • Thomas Shapiro, professor of law and social policy at Brandeis University, said the “easiest answer” to narrowing racial gaps is to promote home ownership, which would help minority families accumulate wealth.

    “The wealth gap is not just a story of merit and achievement, it’s also a story of the historical legacy of race in the United Sates,” said Shapiro, author of “The Hidden Cost of Being African American.”

    Shelton, of the NAACP, called for more funding for preschool programs such as Head Start, improving public schools and making college more affordable.

    “Income should not be a significant determining factor whether someone should have an opportunity to go to college,” Shelton said.

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Email this Story

    Nov 13, 11:23 PM (ET)

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    (AP) National Council of Negro Women President Dorothy Height, center, is assisted by former Amb. Andrew...
    Full Image


    WASHINGTON (AP) - Martin Luther King Jr. belongs among American icons like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, national leaders said Monday at the ceremonial groundbreaking for a King memorial.

    "We give Martin Luther King his rightful place among the many Americans honored on the National Mall," President Bush told a crowd of about 5,000.

    King's memorial, he said, "will unite the men who declared the promise of America and defended the promise of America with the man who redeemed the promise of America."

    The King memorial, slated to open in the spring of 2008, will be the first monument for a civilian and black leader on the large park at Washington's core. It is also probably among the last monuments on the Mall following a 2003 vote in Congress to sharply limit development of the parkland.

    (AP) Yoland King, left, and Martin Luther King III, right, children of Martin Luther King Jr., arrive on...
    Full Image
    The stage in front of the crowd was filled with King's fellow civil rights leaders such as Jesse Jackson, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, politicians including Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, and three of King's children. A gospel choir sang, and Maya Angelou read poetry. Children read essays they had written about King.

    Clinton, who signed legislation in 1996 authorizing the memorial, received a standing ovation from the largely black crowd. He told the crowd of King's commitment to nonviolence and social justice causes such as ending poverty, saying those goals still have not yet been achieved.

    "If he were here, he would remind us that the time to do right remains," Clinton said.

    The memorial will occupy a four-acre plot on the banks of the Tidal Basin, near the Potomac River. The Jefferson Memorial is across the Tidal Basin, while the Lincoln Memorial lies to the northwest, near the river.

    The design is based in part on King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. Before repeating the "Let freedom ring" refrain, King told the crowd, "We will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope."

    (AP) Entertainer Nick Cannon smiles as he arrives on the red carpet for the National Dream Dinner Gala...
    Full Image
    Visitors will pass through an entryway cut through a massive stone symbolizing the mountain of despair and once inside, will come upon the missing section marking the stone of hope, bearing a carved profile of King. It will be ringed with walls chiseled with King's words that may eventually be the base for a waterfall.

    Obama, who has said he is considering a presidential run in 2008, spoke shortly after Bush. He imagined bringing his two young children to the memorial when it is completed and passing through the mountain of despair.

    "He never did live to see the promised land from that mountaintop," Obama said. "But he pointed the way for us."

    Winfrey credited King and other civil rights leaders with making it possible for her to build her talk show empire.

    "It's because of them that I can be heard," she said. "I do not take that for granted, not for one breath."

    (AP) Singer Michael Bolton smiles as he poses upon arriving on the red carpet for the National Dream...
    Full Image
    The memorial was first conceived in 1983 by members of King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. But it has been beset by delays and fundraising issues - the memorial's foundation still has only $70 million of the estimated $100 million construction cost.

    Eugene Williams, a Washington resident and an Alpha Phi Alpha member, said he believed the rest of the money will be found now that people know the memorial will be built.

    "Absolutely, it's coming forth," he said of funding. "This is a monument to the fact that no other person in history has done what King has done."

    In a seat nearby, Carolyn Jackson of Philadelphia recalled how as an 18-year-old in 1963 she was among the vast crowd who heard King's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. With much of the civil rights struggle still ahead, Jackson didn't imagine at the time she would be back on the National Mall again because of King.

    But she was back despite the cold and rainy weather, and this time not at a memorial borrowed from another leader.

    "It's a full circle for black people in this country," Jackson said.

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Email this Story

    Nov 13, 11:23 PM (ET)

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    (AP) National Council of Negro Women President Dorothy Height, center, is assisted by former Amb. Andrew...
    Full Image


    WASHINGTON (AP) - Martin Luther King Jr. belongs among American icons like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, national leaders said Monday at the ceremonial groundbreaking for a King memorial.

    "We give Martin Luther King his rightful place among the many Americans honored on the National Mall," President Bush told a crowd of about 5,000.

    King's memorial, he said, "will unite the men who declared the promise of America and defended the promise of America with the man who redeemed the promise of America."

    The King memorial, slated to open in the spring of 2008, will be the first monument for a civilian and black leader on the large park at Washington's core. It is also probably among the last monuments on the Mall following a 2003 vote in Congress to sharply limit development of the parkland.

    (AP) Yoland King, left, and Martin Luther King III, right, children of Martin Luther King Jr., arrive on...
    Full Image
    The stage in front of the crowd was filled with King's fellow civil rights leaders such as Jesse Jackson, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, politicians including Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, and three of King's children. A gospel choir sang, and Maya Angelou read poetry. Children read essays they had written about King.

    Clinton, who signed legislation in 1996 authorizing the memorial, received a standing ovation from the largely black crowd. He told the crowd of King's commitment to nonviolence and social justice causes such as ending poverty, saying those goals still have not yet been achieved.

    "If he were here, he would remind us that the time to do right remains," Clinton said.

    The memorial will occupy a four-acre plot on the banks of the Tidal Basin, near the Potomac River. The Jefferson Memorial is across the Tidal Basin, while the Lincoln Memorial lies to the northwest, near the river.

    The design is based in part on King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. Before repeating the "Let freedom ring" refrain, King told the crowd, "We will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope."

    (AP) Entertainer Nick Cannon smiles as he arrives on the red carpet for the National Dream Dinner Gala...
    Full Image
    Visitors will pass through an entryway cut through a massive stone symbolizing the mountain of despair and once inside, will come upon the missing section marking the stone of hope, bearing a carved profile of King. It will be ringed with walls chiseled with King's words that may eventually be the base for a waterfall.

    Obama, who has said he is considering a presidential run in 2008, spoke shortly after Bush. He imagined bringing his two young children to the memorial when it is completed and passing through the mountain of despair.

    "He never did live to see the promised land from that mountaintop," Obama said. "But he pointed the way for us."

    Winfrey credited King and other civil rights leaders with making it possible for her to build her talk show empire.

    "It's because of them that I can be heard," she said. "I do not take that for granted, not for one breath."

    (AP) Singer Michael Bolton smiles as he poses upon arriving on the red carpet for the National Dream...
    Full Image
    The memorial was first conceived in 1983 by members of King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. But it has been beset by delays and fundraising issues - the memorial's foundation still has only $70 million of the estimated $100 million construction cost.

    Eugene Williams, a Washington resident and an Alpha Phi Alpha member, said he believed the rest of the money will be found now that people know the memorial will be built.

    "Absolutely, it's coming forth," he said of funding. "This is a monument to the fact that no other person in history has done what King has done."

    In a seat nearby, Carolyn Jackson of Philadelphia recalled how as an 18-year-old in 1963 she was among the vast crowd who heard King's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. With much of the civil rights struggle still ahead, Jackson didn't imagine at the time she would be back on the National Mall again because of King.

    But she was back despite the cold and rainy weather, and this time not at a memorial borrowed from another leader.

    "It's a full circle for black people in this country," Jackson said.

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Email this Story

    Nov 13, 11:23 PM (ET)

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    (AP) National Council of Negro Women President Dorothy Height, center, is assisted by former Amb. Andrew...
    Full Image


    WASHINGTON (AP) - Martin Luther King Jr. belongs among American icons like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, national leaders said Monday at the ceremonial groundbreaking for a King memorial.

    "We give Martin Luther King his rightful place among the many Americans honored on the National Mall," President Bush told a crowd of about 5,000.

    King's memorial, he said, "will unite the men who declared the promise of America and defended the promise of America with the man who redeemed the promise of America."

    The King memorial, slated to open in the spring of 2008, will be the first monument for a civilian and black leader on the large park at Washington's core. It is also probably among the last monuments on the Mall following a 2003 vote in Congress to sharply limit development of the parkland.

    (AP) Yoland King, left, and Martin Luther King III, right, children of Martin Luther King Jr., arrive on...
    Full Image
    The stage in front of the crowd was filled with King's fellow civil rights leaders such as Jesse Jackson, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, politicians including Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, and three of King's children. A gospel choir sang, and Maya Angelou read poetry. Children read essays they had written about King.

    Clinton, who signed legislation in 1996 authorizing the memorial, received a standing ovation from the largely black crowd. He told the crowd of King's commitment to nonviolence and social justice causes such as ending poverty, saying those goals still have not yet been achieved.

    "If he were here, he would remind us that the time to do right remains," Clinton said.

    The memorial will occupy a four-acre plot on the banks of the Tidal Basin, near the Potomac River. The Jefferson Memorial is across the Tidal Basin, while the Lincoln Memorial lies to the northwest, near the river.

    The design is based in part on King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. Before repeating the "Let freedom ring" refrain, King told the crowd, "We will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope."

    (AP) Entertainer Nick Cannon smiles as he arrives on the red carpet for the National Dream Dinner Gala...
    Full Image
    Visitors will pass through an entryway cut through a massive stone symbolizing the mountain of despair and once inside, will come upon the missing section marking the stone of hope, bearing a carved profile of King. It will be ringed with walls chiseled with King's words that may eventually be the base for a waterfall.

    Obama, who has said he is considering a presidential run in 2008, spoke shortly after Bush. He imagined bringing his two young children to the memorial when it is completed and passing through the mountain of despair.

    "He never did live to see the promised land from that mountaintop," Obama said. "But he pointed the way for us."

    Winfrey credited King and other civil rights leaders with making it possible for her to build her talk show empire.

    "It's because of them that I can be heard," she said. "I do not take that for granted, not for one breath."

    (AP) Singer Michael Bolton smiles as he poses upon arriving on the red carpet for the National Dream...
    Full Image
    The memorial was first conceived in 1983 by members of King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. But it has been beset by delays and fundraising issues - the memorial's foundation still has only $70 million of the estimated $100 million construction cost.

    Eugene Williams, a Washington resident and an Alpha Phi Alpha member, said he believed the rest of the money will be found now that people know the memorial will be built.

    "Absolutely, it's coming forth," he said of funding. "This is a monument to the fact that no other person in history has done what King has done."

    In a seat nearby, Carolyn Jackson of Philadelphia recalled how as an 18-year-old in 1963 she was among the vast crowd who heard King's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. With much of the civil rights struggle still ahead, Jackson didn't imagine at the time she would be back on the National Mall again because of King.

    But she was back despite the cold and rainy weather, and this time not at a memorial borrowed from another leader.

    "It's a full circle for black people in this country," Jackson said.

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Email this Story

    Nov 13, 11:23 PM (ET)

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    (AP) National Council of Negro Women President Dorothy Height, center, is assisted by former Amb. Andrew...
    Full Image


    WASHINGTON (AP) - Martin Luther King Jr. belongs among American icons like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, national leaders said Monday at the ceremonial groundbreaking for a King memorial.

    "We give Martin Luther King his rightful place among the many Americans honored on the National Mall," President Bush told a crowd of about 5,000.

    King's memorial, he said, "will unite the men who declared the promise of America and defended the promise of America with the man who redeemed the promise of America."

    The King memorial, slated to open in the spring of 2008, will be the first monument for a civilian and black leader on the large park at Washington's core. It is also probably among the last monuments on the Mall following a 2003 vote in Congress to sharply limit development of the parkland.

    (AP) Yoland King, left, and Martin Luther King III, right, children of Martin Luther King Jr., arrive on...
    Full Image
    The stage in front of the crowd was filled with King's fellow civil rights leaders such as Jesse Jackson, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, politicians including Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, and three of King's children. A gospel choir sang, and Maya Angelou read poetry. Children read essays they had written about King.

    Clinton, who signed legislation in 1996 authorizing the memorial, received a standing ovation from the largely black crowd. He told the crowd of King's commitment to nonviolence and social justice causes such as ending poverty, saying those goals still have not yet been achieved.

    "If he were here, he would remind us that the time to do right remains," Clinton said.

    The memorial will occupy a four-acre plot on the banks of the Tidal Basin, near the Potomac River. The Jefferson Memorial is across the Tidal Basin, while the Lincoln Memorial lies to the northwest, near the river.

    The design is based in part on King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. Before repeating the "Let freedom ring" refrain, King told the crowd, "We will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope."

    (AP) Entertainer Nick Cannon smiles as he arrives on the red carpet for the National Dream Dinner Gala...
    Full Image
    Visitors will pass through an entryway cut through a massive stone symbolizing the mountain of despair and once inside, will come upon the missing section marking the stone of hope, bearing a carved profile of King. It will be ringed with walls chiseled with King's words that may eventually be the base for a waterfall.

    Obama, who has said he is considering a presidential run in 2008, spoke shortly after Bush. He imagined bringing his two young children to the memorial when it is completed and passing through the mountain of despair.

    "He never did live to see the promised land from that mountaintop," Obama said. "But he pointed the way for us."

    Winfrey credited King and other civil rights leaders with making it possible for her to build her talk show empire.

    "It's because of them that I can be heard," she said. "I do not take that for granted, not for one breath."

    (AP) Singer Michael Bolton smiles as he poses upon arriving on the red carpet for the National Dream...
    Full Image
    The memorial was first conceived in 1983 by members of King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. But it has been beset by delays and fundraising issues - the memorial's foundation still has only $70 million of the estimated $100 million construction cost.

    Eugene Williams, a Washington resident and an Alpha Phi Alpha member, said he believed the rest of the money will be found now that people know the memorial will be built.

    "Absolutely, it's coming forth," he said of funding. "This is a monument to the fact that no other person in history has done what King has done."

    In a seat nearby, Carolyn Jackson of Philadelphia recalled how as an 18-year-old in 1963 she was among the vast crowd who heard King's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. With much of the civil rights struggle still ahead, Jackson didn't imagine at the time she would be back on the National Mall again because of King.

    But she was back despite the cold and rainy weather, and this time not at a memorial borrowed from another leader.

    "It's a full circle for black people in this country," Jackson said.

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    My Way News - Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Bush Leads King Groundbreaking Ceremony

    Email this Story

    Nov 13, 11:23 PM (ET)

    By STEPHEN MANNING
    (AP) National Council of Negro Women President Dorothy Height, center, is assisted by former Amb. Andrew...
    Full Image


    WASHINGTON (AP) - Martin Luther King Jr. belongs among American icons like Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, national leaders said Monday at the ceremonial groundbreaking for a King memorial.

    "We give Martin Luther King his rightful place among the many Americans honored on the National Mall," President Bush told a crowd of about 5,000.

    King's memorial, he said, "will unite the men who declared the promise of America and defended the promise of America with the man who redeemed the promise of America."

    The King memorial, slated to open in the spring of 2008, will be the first monument for a civilian and black leader on the large park at Washington's core. It is also probably among the last monuments on the Mall following a 2003 vote in Congress to sharply limit development of the parkland.

    (AP) Yoland King, left, and Martin Luther King III, right, children of Martin Luther King Jr., arrive on...
    Full Image
    The stage in front of the crowd was filled with King's fellow civil rights leaders such as Jesse Jackson, celebrities like Oprah Winfrey, politicians including Illinois Sen. Barack Obama, and three of King's children. A gospel choir sang, and Maya Angelou read poetry. Children read essays they had written about King.

    Clinton, who signed legislation in 1996 authorizing the memorial, received a standing ovation from the largely black crowd. He told the crowd of King's commitment to nonviolence and social justice causes such as ending poverty, saying those goals still have not yet been achieved.

    "If he were here, he would remind us that the time to do right remains," Clinton said.

    The memorial will occupy a four-acre plot on the banks of the Tidal Basin, near the Potomac River. The Jefferson Memorial is across the Tidal Basin, while the Lincoln Memorial lies to the northwest, near the river.

    The design is based in part on King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. Before repeating the "Let freedom ring" refrain, King told the crowd, "We will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope."

    (AP) Entertainer Nick Cannon smiles as he arrives on the red carpet for the National Dream Dinner Gala...
    Full Image
    Visitors will pass through an entryway cut through a massive stone symbolizing the mountain of despair and once inside, will come upon the missing section marking the stone of hope, bearing a carved profile of King. It will be ringed with walls chiseled with King's words that may eventually be the base for a waterfall.

    Obama, who has said he is considering a presidential run in 2008, spoke shortly after Bush. He imagined bringing his two young children to the memorial when it is completed and passing through the mountain of despair.

    "He never did live to see the promised land from that mountaintop," Obama said. "But he pointed the way for us."

    Winfrey credited King and other civil rights leaders with making it possible for her to build her talk show empire.

    "It's because of them that I can be heard," she said. "I do not take that for granted, not for one breath."

    (AP) Singer Michael Bolton smiles as he poses upon arriving on the red carpet for the National Dream...
    Full Image
    The memorial was first conceived in 1983 by members of King's fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. But it has been beset by delays and fundraising issues - the memorial's foundation still has only $70 million of the estimated $100 million construction cost.

    Eugene Williams, a Washington resident and an Alpha Phi Alpha member, said he believed the rest of the money will be found now that people know the memorial will be built.

    "Absolutely, it's coming forth," he said of funding. "This is a monument to the fact that no other person in history has done what King has done."

    In a seat nearby, Carolyn Jackson of Philadelphia recalled how as an 18-year-old in 1963 she was among the vast crowd who heard King's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. With much of the civil rights struggle still ahead, Jackson didn't imagine at the time she would be back on the National Mall again because of King.

    But she was back despite the cold and rainy weather, and this time not at a memorial borrowed from another leader.

    "It's a full circle for black people in this country," Jackson said.